Crisis and Opportunity: Restrictions on Post-War Building

Three responses to the regulations: shrinking, reusing, overlaying.   As a result of its dispersed population and relatively poor economic standing, Norwegian architecture was not dictated by the stylistic changes that governed the architecture of continental Europe. Architectural innovation in Norway was typically seen through…

Lambertseter, an emblem of Norwegianess

Perhaps we can simply say that a certain receptiveness to international planning ideas is a distinguishing feature of Nordic urban development (…) [for example] England’s New Towns were held up as ideals and adapted to the nature of suburbs like Lambertseter 1 Describing the Norwegian…

The Ornamental Potential of Concrete

Elkemhuset, designed by architect Erling Viksjø, is a remarkable building for its experimental use of material. When its construction was initiated in the 1960s the use of aluminium as a facade material and silicon metal as an aggregate in concrete was considered pioneering within Europe.1…

Transforming Hauskvartalet

The corner of Hausmannsgate and Møllergata invites curiosity. Today, it stands with fading graffiti-clad walls, boarded up windows, and an Urbanium site office comfortably nestled around the corner – the neighbourhood is heavy with suggestion of urban transformation. Architecture is a mirror of dominant societal…

Surface as an Experiment

Empty, raw and misty space. Høyblokken. All is left is pure structure. The rough concrete ceilings, the colossal pilotis, the abstract sandblasted, wall-fixed art and the Conglo-concrete floor. No windows, partition walls, flooring, fixtures, air-ducts, furniture, equipment, office supplies and people. This “prenatal” version of the building, being…